Female Pedophile Research

Thanks to people like FM we are able to find studies that we have overlooked and add them to the Bibliography page.  Here is one he just posted in the comments section that we added:

The Forgotten Ones: Maternal Abusers and their Victims: a Pilot Study

Abstract

This paper analyses the phenomenon of mothers who sexually abuse their children, most specifically their sons. It defines the term Maternal Abuse, offers a review of the contemporary academic discourse on female sexual abusers, and presents a quantitative study of maternal abuse in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, which appears to show that the existing statistics from Health Board and ISPCC reports (SEHB Section 8 Report, 1997; ISPCC National Report, 1997) significantly underestimate it’s prevelence. It concludes by suggesting that though Ireland is considerably more aware of the phenomenon of sexual abuse than in the past, but that the incidence of this particular type of abuse is poorly recognised by the child protection and welfare authorities.

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4 thoughts on “Female Pedophile Research

  1. Actually Dan I think you may find that there will always be someone who is willing to listen to both male & female survivors of female perpetrated child sexual abuse. This is exactly why this website and other survivor websites, forums and blogs exist. I am pleased that you have raised the issue of being “beaten up” when you reported your abuse because this touches on the very important issue of disclosure prevention. Here are a few examples of how a child’s disclosure of sexual abuse may be prevented by female abusers.

    Example 1: Sister disclosed mother’s sexual abuse of Kevin, age 14

    Questioned by a professional, “I’ve never seen a kid look so frightened. He actually wet himself. He became hysterical and babbled. He was convinced this was his end and his mother would now torture him to death.´

    Abused from age 3 – 14 (Saradjian, 1996, p. 34)

    Example 2: “When I was very young, my mother used to drive all us kids out a lonely, isolated country road. Then she’d drop some of my kittens out the door. She’d drive ahead, turn around, then drive back past the kittens crying on the road. This was called abandoning. Later she threatened that if I told anyone about any of the abuse, by anyone, I’d be taken to an orphanage and never see my family again. I believed her. I knew how easy it was for her to abandon small, vulnerable creatures.” (Rosencrans, 1997)

  2. Hello, ,Im so happy i found this website! i was trying to start a facebook group about raising awareness about female pedophiles, but nobody wanted to join! as if they just didnt believe it, which is why I wanted to raise awareness. My husband and his 2 brothers were abused, and sexually abused by their mother. IM not going to get into details, however now she dresses like a nun and hides in a church here in Canada, telling everyone she meets that she is hiding from her abusive children who hate her and want to harm her. In the mean time, her whole family is scared of her, her sister remembers this woman performing oral sex on her toddler son, this continued until he was 10, besides all the other things. I would really like to start something here in Canada about Raising awareness about female pedophiles, they get over looked so easily, im thinking due to their “feminine” nature and motherly looks. These are the pedophiles that get away the easiest because nobody believes it! ” nah your mother wouldnt do that to you, she loves you!” I would really like to get the ball rolling and set something up, however of course i have no idea how to begin and where. Goos job with the site I am very happy I found it.

  3. Hi camilla,
    I am also in Canada, and interested in touching base with you on this. It’s been suggested to me that there are, perhaps, those within various federal govt. ministries with an agenda to keep this subject out of the public’s awareness. I’ve been doing a bit of research, and my experience tends to substantiate this. I myself have contacted myriad agencies, Abuse Awareness groups, Victims services, etc… in Ontario: All told me the only way in to the justice system was to report to my local precinct. Each and every time I was told there are no services for survivors of female offenders (although I was – curiously – referred to men’s groups!), and I invariably get the vague, marshmallow response (meaning they will nod and say ‘Mm-hm’ but not listen, provide no responses or recommendation when I ask whom else I could go to for assistance, and just wait less-than-politely until I hang up). Except for the Toronto Police that is (the body I was told to go to to report my own abuse), who in addition to giving the ‘Mm-hm’ response repeatedly laughed on the phone (at someone else’s jokes) as they were ‘listening’ to my questions.

    If you see this message, please ask the administrators on this site to forward my e-mail address to you. I will contact them to give them permission (and beg their forgiveness for putting them in this position of intermediary!).

    I would also suggest contacting Barbara Kay at the National Post; regardless what you may think of her political views, she is very understanding and supportive of this subject. And tell her I say “hello”!

    I look forward to communicating with you!

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